AskDefine | Define strafing

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Verb

strafing
  1. present participle of strafe

Extensive Definition

For the fictional character see Strafe (Transformers).
Strafing is the practice of attacking ground targets from low-flying aircraft. The term is usually applied to attack with aircraft-mounted automatic weapons, but may be applied to attacks with bombs, though not high-level bomb delivery. By extension the term is sometimes applied to the firing of non-airborne automatic weapons while moving.
Strafing is frequently referred to as "Ground attack". Although the earliest use of military aircraft was for observation and directing of artillery strafing was frequently practiced in World War I. Eddie Rickenbacker attacked a German artillery train at the Battle of St. Mihiel,. World War II saw the advent of the Ground attack aircraft specifically designed for the task of strafing. Many such aircraft also utilised non-strafing attack methods such as bombs or rockets.

Etymology

The word is an adaptation of German strafen, to punish, specifically from the World War I humorous adaptation of the German catchphrase "Gott strafe England".

Gaming

This term has been adopted by certain gamers to mean "sidestepping", primarily in first-person shooters (FPS); in this context, it refers to the movement alone, even when no weapon is being fired. The origin of this malapropism is uncertain, but is most likely derived from either a misunderstanding of the military term, or from the Greek word strephein, meaning "to turn". The word "strafe" was used in game menus at least as early as the popular FPS Wolfenstein 3D, suggesting the blame for the initial malapropism lies with video game developers ignorant of English vocabulary. Sidestepping is an integral part of any first-person shooter as it allows the player to dodge incoming fire while keeping their view aimed at their target.
It should, however, be noted very few modern first-person shooters use the term "strafe" themselves – most game menus use the more semantically transparent "move left" and "move right" instead. However, "strafe" is firmly established in gamer jargon.

Poetry

Used in some poems to contrast storms and military Siege. E.g Seamus Heaney's 'Storm on the Island'
strafing in Russian: Стрейф
Privacy Policy, About Us, Terms and Conditions, Contact Us
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
Material from Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Dict
Valid HTML 4.01 Strict, Valid CSS Level 2.1